The Real Epidemic and How To Fight It

Recently a colleague of mine was lamenting about why the government doesn’t mandate healthy nutrition and vigorous exercise. Now this is likely a response to the covid-19 epidemic and having to wear masks everywhere we go. And yes, I believe in masks, I wear them in my Boonton personal training studio and not just as a show for the people walking down Main Street.

I wear them because I train numerous people who currently are at risk and I wish to keep them safe. No I’m not going to turn this into a mask vs. no mask, or whether or not this thing is overblown. I also go through about a gallon and a half per week in disinfectants.

The epidemic I’m talking about is made more deadly by covid. I’m talking about obesity. Recently a news article came across my feed that claimed that 70-80% of the people that are hospitalized and intubated are obese.

And with the rates of obesity in this country, that’s one of the reasons it’s been so devastating.

Infographic: Over 40% Of U.S. Adults Are Susceptible to Severe Covid-19 | Statista

What I had said to him was that if you ask 100 people if they thought healthy nutrition and vigorous exercise is a good thing, 99 would say yes. The remaining 1% is just being a troll.

It’s no secret that eating right and exercising is good for us. We all know it.

But how many of us actually do it?

So let’s address the claim that we should mandate healthy nutrition and exercise. What would the guidance on what to do be? Considering the fact that they consider pizza a vegetable, I wonder how effective they would actually be at it.

What would the repercussions be? Would there be a fine? Surely it can’t be any higher than the costs of healthcare associated with being overweight and unhealthy. What about jail? Not having the strength and health to live life on your own terms is a jail sentence in itself.

And with all those things already in place, would we really need to put more on top of that? I don’t think so.

So how do we fix it? I’m not sure really. The people who come to my personal training studio in Boonton have already made the decision to do something about it. And that initial decision to do something is often times the hardest part.

I think what it really boils down to is fear. Fear of giving up the comforts and vices we currently have in favor of blood, sweat, tears and rabbit food.

Danny Trejo on Twitter: "I want a hot body but I also want tacos  #TacoTuesday @TrejosTacos… "

The truth is… training isn’t that bad. You just have to provide a challenge to create a change. Yeah you’ll work hard but you may find you enjoy the process. One of my guys recently asked me to crank it up and though he grunts and complains, he likes it though he’ll never admit that to me.

And the healthy food doesn’t have to taste all that bad either, and you won’t be starving yourself. One of my guys who is currently going through the Amazing 12 Express Body Transformation Program had said at the start “There is no way I could lose weight eating this much food.” It’s about 8 weeks later and his belly fat has gone down significantly, and he still eats out at nice restaurants once a week.

And the truth is, any steps you take will be better than no steps. But if you want to really make incredible changes, you’ll need an organized, thought-out, structured approach. Going into each training session with a game plan and ready to give it your best. Doing that will bring you results faster than you may have thought possible, and it’ll help you live life to it’s fullest.

If you need my help with this, I have a 1 week free trial of my personal training program so you can see if you like it. Just text me at 973 476 5328 and introduce yourself. Easy right? All it takes is that decision to do something about it and actually taking action by texting me. What happens next is up to you.


Eric Moss is a personal trainer in Boonton and doubles as a world-record-holding modern-day professional performing strongman, author, and motivational speaker. In the tradition of the strongmen more common during the turn of the century, he performs feats of strength such as bending steel and breaking chains as part of a show and speaks on goal achievement for corporations, nonprofits, government as well as for schools and universities. His exclusive personal training studio is located on Main Street in Boonton New Jersey, is close to Mountain Lakes, Denville, Montville and Parsippany New Jersey.

When is it “ok” to change training programs?

About a week ago I was having a conversation with one of my personal training clients. She had wanted to know when I plan on switching up the exercises involved in her program even though in her words her abs are the strongest they’ve ever been. She enjoys training just for the sake of training and adding fitness into her life, and there are no hard deadlines or anything specific (like a wedding, class reunion or big game) to peak for.

Like many answers when it comes to fitness, strength, health and all that fun stuff the answer is “it depends”

Depends on what? Well, a number of things really. If you wanted to be truly great at something it might take a lifetime of dedication to a single thing. If you just wanted to be generally healthy and fit, you have a bit more flexibility with that one.

Yes this will work

If I accept someone into the Amazing 12 Body Transformation programs, the program (as in the exercises involved) doesn’t change until after the 12-week time frame is over. No, it’s not the same thing day after day, and actually, in Amazing 12 classic there are segments left to the coach’s discretion, but that was also a program that wasn’t designed by me.

The program does progress, just like the ones I write. You see when it comes to writing programs there are a number of different things that can be configured and progressed. Exercise selection is actually the last thing the body adapts to, and some of my personal training clients thrive on the same exercises day after day.

What I usually like to change first are the sets, the reps, the load, and in some cases the cadence or time under tension. Unless I’m using a spreadsheet or something the prescribed load and total rep happens based on what I’m predicting my client can handle on a given day and where they are in their progression.

What I used to say a while back is when people would say they were getting bored, was that the training programs are intended to bring them to their goals, not to entertain them.

Nowadays and maybe I’m getting soft, or maybe I’ve wisened up a little bit but I’ll change it up for them. I mean are they going to be more or less likely to achieve their goal if they lose their love of training? The fact of the matter is that there are more ways up the mountain than just one. And yes, some routes are faster and more direct than others, but that doesn’t mean the others won’t get you there eventually as well.

Sticking to the basics is important, but so is enthusiasm for training. One shouldn’t come at the complete expense of the other.

Now one of the things, is progress can be a terrific motivator. According to Tony Robbins, people are actually more happy when making progress towards a goal than they are actually achieving it. So an appropriate time to change programs is when you stop reaping the benefits of the program.

Another would be when the program would no longer be appropriate. As an example, I have a high school athlete as a personal training client. When he came to me, it was in the middle of the season so the program had to provide quick non-exhaustive gains in strength. I put a laser focus on hex bar deadlifting and loaded carries since I knew they could progress quickly and have a high carry over.

personal training studio in Boonton
a hex bar deadlift to a loaded carry being demonstrated by my client Ken in my personal training studio in Boonton

When in-between seasons I had seen that there was a gap in his pushing strength. So I switched his program (we stopped getting gains in his overhead pressing strength) and put him on a progression that could make him more tired, but would produce rapid and dramatic progress before the season started again.

How rapid and how dramatic? Well at the end of approximately 13 weeks of training he put up an easy 8 reps with 125% of his one repetition max in the military press. As in he did 8 reps with a weight 25% heavier than what he could do for one at the beginning.

His single-hand kettlebell overhead press went to doing 19 consecutive reps with his previous 1 rep max and he still had some left in the tank. That is dramatic progress, especially if you compare it to a standard periodization program which might see a 25% increase if it’s a good program that is.

Now that the season is getting close, we’ll dial it back and put him on a program more appropriate to his situation. Yes, he was still gaining with the first one just not as fast or dramatic, but the situation itself is changing and I wanted to give his body a chance to adapt to the new program.

Also sometimes your goals change. Sometimes a goal that once excited you no longer does. It’s ok. You can either achieve your goal, or you can lose interest. There was at one point when I would have done anything to win my ex back. Nowadays knowing her true character and being married to someone better, I’d rather make out with a toilet seat.

Now I appreciate you sticking with me this long, especially given the attention span these days. So I’ll just provide a quick list of instances when it’s ok to change programs. There may be more but this is what I have for now.

  1. when you achieve your goals
  2. if you lose interest in your goals
  3. if the program you are on stops giving you reasonable levels of progress
  4. if the situation no longer fits the program
  5. if it kills your love of training
  6. if your body screams that you need to (ie something hurts)
  7. if I tell you to (it helps to have a coach that can objectively look at the situation)

I hope that helps you out. If you have any questions or are in the Boonton area and are looking to take charge of your health, transform your body and achieve your goals, I offer a free trial membership of my personal training program. Just text me at 973 476 5328 and introduce yourself.


Eric Moss is a personal trainer in Boonton and doubles as a world-record-holding modern-day professional performing strongman, author, and motivational speaker. In the tradition of the strongmen more common during the turn of the century, he performs feats of strength such as bending steel and breaking chains as part of a show and speaks on goal achievement for corporations, nonprofits, government as well as for schools and universities. His exclusive personal training studio is located on Main Street in Boonton New Jersey, is close to Mountain Lakes, Denville, Montville and Parsippany New Jersey.

Power Breathing for Safety and Strength

I have a chiropractor I go to simply because bending steel is hard on the body, and can put things out of alignment. My chiropractor regularly sees a spike in business after a snowstorm, many times because people throw their backs out while shoveling snow.

Since it’s snowing right now and is expected to keep snowing throughout the day, I figured I could give you this quick tip now and save your back when shoveling snow later, and possibly keep you out of the chiropractor’s office unnecessarily (sorry doc!)

First, the information in this post is for informational purposes only. And it is given under the assumption that you don’t have any blood pressure or cardiovascular issues.

So when you dig your shovel into the snow, there is going to be a couple things to keep in mind. One is your spinal alignment which I can try to explain as keep your spine long, and try to get the movement from your hips and legs.

When it comes time to fling the snow sip in air like you are drinking a cup of coffee (coffee is my pre-workout of choice). Imagine as if you are filling a vase from the bottom up. Then trap the air in your stomach like you are trying to squish a bubble as you fling the snow to the side of the driveway.

What this does is provide support for the spine using your abs like a safety belt. This technique is something I teach as part of optimal technique training in my personal training studio in Boonton for things like kettlebell swings, deadlifts, overhead pressing, etc. Safety shouldn’t come at the expense of strength, and strength shouldn’t come at the expense of safety either. They work together simultaneously as part of optimal technique.

Many times also people get a rude awakening when they go to shovel their driveway when they realize they got out of shape. If this is you, and you want to sample my program, I offer a free trial membership. Just text me at 973 476 5328 and let me know when you’d like to get started.


Eric Moss is a personal trainer in Boonton and doubles as a world-record-holding modern-day professional performing strongman, author, and motivational speaker. In the tradition of the strongmen more common during the turn of the century, he performs feats of strength such as bending steel and breaking chains as part of a show and speaks on goal achievement for corporations, nonprofits, government as well as for schools and universities. His exclusive personal training studio is located on Main Street in Boonton New Jersey, is close to Mountain Lakes, Denville, Montville and Parsippany New Jersey.